Tag Archives: Analog

[enchantment] Brigitte Bloom

Brigitte Bloom, photography, film photography, analog, ethereal, dark, obscure, color photography

Website

Image © Brigitte Bloom

[enchantment] Andrea Ebener

Andrea Ebener, photography, analog, black and white photography, dark, obscure, silver gelatin print
Cargo

Image © Andrea Ebener

[enchantment] Brittany Markert

Brittany Markert, photography, dark, obscure, black and white, analog
Tumblr

Image © Brittany Markert

[enchantment] Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco, photography, dark, obscure, surreal, ethereal, analog, film photography

Flickr

Image © Oleg Oprisco

[enchantment] Nastya Kaletkina

Nastya Kaletkina, photography, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

 

Flickr

Image © Nastya Kaletkina

Ethereal self-portraits by Ingrid Royer

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

There is a bit of mystery about Ingrid Royer, a photographer I already featured in this [enchantment] post. All I found out searching the net is that her real name is probably Ingrid Fenet-Hillion, she’s from France and she’s mainly a self-portraiter.

Looking at her work on Tumblr I thought that she probably is inspired by other two artists I really love, Rimel Neffati (very first post on this blog) and Kristamas Klousch; on her Twitter feed, then I noticed she likes a lot the Queen of all female self-portraiters, the great Francesca Woodman. I think it’s clear now what you can expect from Ingrid Royer’s pictures: black and white, delicate and often blurred pictures of the photographer herself, wearing masks, holding skulls; body details covered with white lace dresses; grainy vintage like shots.

I must admit I like Ingrid’s art, and I hope she will continue taking pictures (latest post on her Tumblr blog is dated march 2015) so to develop a more personal style balancing a bit the strong references to Woodman, Klousch and Neffati.

 

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

Ingrid Royer, photography, self-portrait, dark, obscure, analog, black and white

 

Tumblr

Images © Ingridrfh

[enchantment] Luca Bortolato

Luca Bortolato, photography, dark, ethereal, analog, film

 

Website

Image © Luca Bortolato

[enchantment] Scott Irvine

Scott Irvine, photography, dark, obscure, polaroid, analog, dark

 

Instagram

Image © Scott Irvine

Rik Garrett – Earth Magic

Rik Garrett-01

There are photographers who like photography and others who like everything about photography and the process behind them, even better if it includes using 100 years old cameras, making some mess with chemicals and using printing methods no one would ever even think about it.

No doubt Rik Garrett is part of the second group since he prints using wet plate process (do you need > wikipedia?) he likes to buy old cameras from thrift stores and ebay and he actually uses them. He started to develop film in his mother darkroom when he was only 14, he then tried a lot of art fields always coming back to photography.

In this post I am focusing on his “Earth Magic” series, a  personal exploration of the relationship between witchcraft, the female form and nature.  If you take your time to check this interview you’ll understand that Rick made an in-deep research and was influenced by a lot of books he read.  Looking at the result it is clear that this is not a mere visual representation of witches (as those you can easily find on lots of Instagram nowadays) but it is a more complex work, involving a lot of elements such as a study of the concept, peculiar medium and working process.
I did not have the opportunity to see the relative book, but from the pictures I saw online, I suppose those who bought it are now owners of a very precious work.

As usual, I add some pictures here, but I strongly suggest you to visit Rik Garrett’s website and to check his other works too.

 

Rik Garrett, dark, experimental, analog, obscure, photography

 

Rik Garrett, dark, experimental, analog, obscure, photography

 

Rik Garrett, dark, experimental, analog, obscure, photography

 

Rik Garrett, dark, experimental, analog, obscure, photography

 

Rik Garrett, dark, experimental, analog, obscure, photography

 

Website

Images © Rik Garrett

Manipulated Polaroids by Andrew Millar

Andrew J Millar, photography, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

This week’s full post is for all those of you in love with Polaroids. If you still do not know the work of Andrew Millar, this is a good chance to start following him.

Andrew is a London photographer who creates amazing art based on Polaroid / Impossible analog films with techniques that include manipulating the emulsion during the developing process, double exposing the film or separating the emulsion from the film base (the so-called “emulsion lift”).

One of his techniques I love the most is the application of gold leaf onto the Impossible films: the results are amazing dark and ethereal artworks.

His subjects are mainly female faces and often, his Polas are displayed in collages of six or more images, In this way, the author creates an additional image with the combination of more photos.

It’s not easy to explain it with words, so why do not you jump directly to the pictures below and the eventually head to Andrew Millar official website?

Before leaving do not forget to share!

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Andrew J Millar, photography, analog, polaroid, impossible, dark, obscure, film manipulation

 

Website

Images © Andrew Millar